Tahrir and the Poetry of Witness

The Utopians of Tahrir Square: Dr. Anba Jawi and Catherine Temma Davidson Introduction by Catherine Davidson The Utopians of Tahrir Square contains poems from 28 young Iraqi poets whose work responds to the protests for human rights that took over Baghdad’s Tahrir (Freedom) Square in 2019. Bringing these poems to life in English was the product […]

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In defence of the Upstart Crow

All writers have a voice, and Francis Bacon is not Shakespeare – not even Shake-spear By Philip R. Hall Shakespeare is the author of his own work, not anyone else. Why should people try to separate Shakespeare from his own work? My rationale for this is quite simple; it’s a miguided attempt to hoard intellectual […]

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Reborn as a Buddhist

My Metamorphosis from Christian caterpillar to Buddhist butterfly By Patrick Taggart Caterpillar: in reality I was a judgemental asshole I am ashamed of the young man I was in 1985. I was an evangelical Christian and I remember chiding a friend for not being sufficiently joyful. Yes, she had lost her only brother, her soulmate, […]

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Editorial: what is humane socialism?

By Phil Hall and the contributors of Ars Notoria I dreamed of a world where people got together into families and then organised into neighbourhoods. From there they organised into districts, then towns and regions and larger regions. I dreamed that everything that was political and economic and social and artistic, and environmental and recreative […]

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Depression: episode 31

By Dan Pearce Dan Pearce has done editorial work for many magazines and newspapers including New Society, Honey, 19, Oz, The Observer, The Times and Sunday Times, Mayfair and Penthouse. Dan has created book and record covers, political cartoons, comic strips and caricatures and he has written two graphic novels: ‘Critical Mess’ (against the nuclear industry) and ‘Oscar: The […]

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Henry VIII: Enemy of the people

The king was a genocidal megalomaniac Bluebeard, a Caligula By Phil Hall A beloved and ailing aunt, a great artist and a generous and beautiful soul, someone loved by nearly all living things (from turtles, cats and dogs, to the husband of a favourite niece) woke up in the middle of the night and called […]

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Photo-essay: Growing up in Metro Manila

The life of the children of street traders and trishaw drivers By Inge Colijn In January 2020 I spent a week in Manila, the capital of the Philippines. I was struck by the many young children I saw being cared for by grandparents, parents and siblings. The children were looked after while their family tended […]

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family celebrating christmas while holding burning sparklers

How can you help a child with anxiety enjoy Christmas?

Many children with anxiety see Christmas as a negative thing. By Stuart Thompson The last 2 years have been far from normal, and last Christmas was quite different for many of us. As Christmas draws closer, we are bombarded with imagery of happy, contented families without a care in the world. However, it’s rarely as ideal or […]

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Piccadilly Style

The Edwardian look saw male fashion at its most elegant By Stephen Hoare Algy, the Piccadilly Johnny with the little glass eye, the subject of a popular music hall song by Vesta Tilley presents an enduring image of the male peacock. Miss Tilley, a small but feisty female whose cross-dressing routines on the Edwardian stage […]

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The Magic of Madagascar

Wishing you a rewarding and sublime journey! By Abhay K. Madagascar is the world’s fourth largest island; after Greenland, New Guinea and Borneo. Madagascar is in the western Indian Ocean. Some consider Madagascar to be the Earth’s eighth continent because it has such enormous biodiversity.  Geologically, Madagascar broke away from Gondwanaland with the rest of […]

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Capitalism relies on people like Keir Starmer and Neil Kinnock

Strategic betrayals are always rewarded By Phil Hall In the Middle Ages in 1381 the mayor of London, William Walworth, killed Wat Tyler at a parlay with a knife by stabbing him in the stomach and then cutting off his head. The mayor’s coat of arms then became the Saint George’s cross with a dagger […]

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Open letter to Nick Bostrom

Never mind existential risk, what are your politics? An open letter to Nick Bostrom, Director of The Future of Humanity Institute at Oxford University By Phil Hall Dear Nick, I think you should be using H. G. Wells’s version of futurology, the one he explores in his book Anticipations and elsewhere and move away from […]

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Do you feel lucky, punk?

Tales of Macau, the biggest poker game in the world By Thomas Levene This article is, in part, my personal poker journey and, partly, an insight into the mysterious and secretive world of nose-bleed cash games that just get bigger and bigger. The elegant Wynn, in Macau Cilade de Sintra, Macau, overlooking Nam Van Lake, […]

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If I ran Monsanto

By Thomas W. Gilbert and Deborah Glaefke Gilbert In this realm of destruction, This hellhole called Earth, There’s a Darth Vader business That’s so full of its worth. It’s consistent; it’s fascist, And it’s blessed with a vision. It has great friends in Congress Who vote each decision Over those who fight back And just […]

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Photo-essay: The Million Man March

The marchers came from all over North America in a shared experience; strangers hugged and held hands as if they were old friends By Andy Hall In 1995, The Nation Of Islam leader, Louis Farrakhan had called for a march on Washington similar to the one 32 years before organised by Martin Luther King and […]

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Socialist arguments against religion

Will there be pie in the sky for us when we die? By Phil Hall Socialist arguments against the use of religion are not always arguments against the idea of an ordering presence in the universe, or against an Earth and a cosmos full of meaning, or against a transcendent expansive all including love, or […]

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Mark this day: social media colludes in the first global act of censorship.

The Internet has been captured by billionaires. Progressive Governments must take note! OUR Internet should be in the commons. By Phil Hall Facebook, Whats App and Instagram went down today – presumably in a damage limitation exercise after the release of the Pandora Papers. It’s frightening and, at the same time, there was the curiously […]

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Can you drive an HGV or pick fruit?

… and global warming: Blah, blah, blah! Zombie Apocalypse, 3rd October 2021 By Gordon Liddle ‘I asked him what food was grown for. He answered, ‘Well, to eat of course!’ ‘No,’ I said, ‘it’s grown for profit.” Well, the Labour conference went well. The Starmeroids have gone home to prepare for government. Said no-one ever. […]

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