Russian Orthodoxy died, and it was not resurrected

It is one thing for religion to die on the vine, and it is another thing for it to be forcibly uprooted by Phil Hall One of the things that was obvious to anyone visiting Soviet Russia in 1984 was its emptiness. They pretended to have the answers initially, and, after Stalin’s mass murder and […]

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Editorial: Putin the Great or Putin the Terrible?

Stop the War! ‘Do you know what I do to people who get in the way of me?’ asked the thuggish manager of a Gazoprom plant sitting across the table from me. ‘No, what do you do to them?’ ‘I destroy them.’ He said. And he stared at me, unsmiling. We must understand one thing […]

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purple green and yellow abstract painting

US and European drug consumers are the real ‘bad hombres’: they generate the trade and cause the deaths

By Phil Hall Again and again, it needs to be reiterated. Mexico’s war against the drug traffickers is mainly a US war. If Mexico has failed to defeat the drug traffickers on one side of the border, then the US has failed to defeat it on the other side of the border. The most powerful […]

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Hurrah for muscular secularism!

Letter from an Ex Sheikh I have always used pseudonyms when participating in online debates. Most of these debates are on sociopolitical matters in Chad and in the Middle East. Not being able to speak French and the high rates of illiteracy in Chad, mean that a large chunk of my contributions go to forums in […]

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Afghan students at the Safar

Cruelty to Boys in Afghan Schools

By Asad Karimi In Afghanistan, while girls have their right to education stripped from them, boys at schools in the countryside are victims of harsh treatment and abuse. Asad Karimi writes about his experience. When I was in Afghanistan and I was six or seven years old, I didn’t like going to school. I hated […]

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Curing the Pig, by Eliza Granville

Episode 9 The Quixotesque misadventures of unreconstructed Marcher Morgan Jones-Jones, who has probably not heard of the suffragettes let alone second- and third-wave feminists. The visible universe could lie on a membrane floating within a higher-dimensional space. The extra dimensions would help unify the forces of nature and could contain parallel universes. —Savas Dimopoulos listen: […]

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Fiji’s Half Century of Independence

By Émile St Clair Fijians on 10 October 2022 celebrated their National Day, and looked forward to the 2022 general election, whose exact date at that time was yet to be announced. Fiji Day prompted at least two high-profile articles in Fiji’s national press, those of Mahendra Chaudhry and Dr Subhash Appanna. Both articles are […]

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Tagore Prize 2021-22 Awarded to Sudeep Sen

Review by Peter Cowlam All of us here at Ars Notoria are delighted at the news that our poetry editor, Sudeep Sen, has been awarded the prestigious Tagore Prize for 2021–22. The Rabindranath Tagore Literary Prize, a literary honour in India conferred annually for published works by Indian authors, recognises novels, short stories, poetry and […]

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The Tragedy of Mister Morn, a Play by Vladimir Nabokov

Review by Peter Cowlam Nabokov, an aristocrat dispossessed by the October Revolution, in what is typical for him applies aesthetics rather than political discourse as filter over the coup Mister Morn has successfully repelled. The distortions of social unease are just a spectre to be poeticised over. It is Morn, who is secretly the King, […]

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Depression # 32 by Dan Pearce

Dan Pearce has done editorial work for many magazines and newspapers including New Society, Honey, 19, Oz, The Observer, The Times and Sunday Times, Mayfair and Penthouse. Dan has created book and record covers, political cartoons, comic strips and caricatures and he has written two graphic novels: ‘Critical Mess’ (against the nuclear industry) and ‘Oscar: The Second Coming’. His […]

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A rat race is for rats. We are not rats.

Jimmy Reid’s 1972 speech on alienation . ALIENATION is the precise and correctly applied word for describing the major social problem in Britain today. People feel alienated by society. In some intellectual circles, it is treated almost as a new phenomenon. It has, however, been with us for years. What I believe to be true […]

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Hamba kahle, Harry. 

HAROLD VOIGT, SOUTH AFRICAN PAINTER 1st May 1939 – 9th October 2022 by Leigh Voigt How does one give an unbiased, honest appraisal of one’s own husband and have the gall to call it an obituary? Does one resort to clichés? Borrow words from the pens of others? No, one hones in on an aspect […]

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Photographs through an art filter

Experiments with photo art applications, in particular the PRISMA application. by Philip Hall Passing photos through ready-made filters hasn’t really taught me much about how paintings and drawings are made, but doing this for a decade has taught me how important it is to have an artist’s eye and how the artist’s eye – even […]

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King Charles III’s Sacred Task: dissolve the institution of Monarchy

Bring the powerful to heel, don’t glorify monarchs and privilege by Philip Hall The idea that Charles III is divinely appointed to rule over us is ridiculously far-fetched. Yet, ultimately, it is the metaphysical idea of the divine right of kings that gives King Charles III his political legitimacy. According to this theory, ordinary British […]

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The Alphabets of Latin America: A Carnival of Poems, by Abhay K

Reviewed by Inderjeet Mani Latin America can lay claim to some of the world’s most magnificent geographies and vital ecosystems, teeming with unique life-forms and vibrant subcultures. The area has also borne witness to vast empires and savage colonial histories, and fired the imaginations of many gifted writers and artists. In The Alphabets of Latin […]

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Curing the Pig, by Eliza Granville

Episode 7 The Quixotesque misadventures of unreconstructed Marcher Morgan Jones-Jones, who has probably not heard of the suffragettes let alone second- and third-wave feminists. That’s the thing about people from the Welsh Marches, we All-Wise Three have observed, they’re neither one thing nor the other – and sometimes they’re both. Offa’s Dyke was supposed to […]

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Obituary: Bryan Greetham, teacher, writer and thinker

By Pat Rowe Bryan Greetham (1946-2022) the writer and thinker, died on Sunday 26th June in Estepona, Spain. Above all, Bryan wanted to help students of all ages be the best thinkers possible. Bryan was born in Faversham, Kent. He failed the 11 plus exam and went to a secondary modern school. But this didn’t […]

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black and red typewriter on white table

Six Poems by Peter Adair

London, 1983 O I had a future. Patrick Kavanagh Once there was a bedsit the size of a coffin. Once there was a man pounding out on his typewriter short stories that never made the classic Irish canon. The inmates twist and turn on their celibate beds. Each avoids the other, scuttling up and down […]

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Piccadilly Style

The Edwardian look saw male fashion at its most elegant By Stephen Hoare Algy, the Piccadilly Johnny with the little glass eye, the subject of a popular music hall song by Vesta Tilley presents an enduring image of the male peacock. Miss Tilley, a small but feisty female whose cross-dressing routines on the Edwardian stage […]

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